1. Epidemiological studies on bacterial respiratory infections in commercial poultry of district Hyderabad, Sindh, Pakistan

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Abdul Gaffar Abbasi, Shahid Hussain Abro , Asghar Ali Kamboh, Dildar Hussain Kalhoro, Muhammad Qasim Mazari Muhammad Bilawal Arain Waseem Ali Vistro Muhammad Azhar Memon, Muhammad Ali Memon Sarfiraz Hussain Depar

Abstract

Respiratory infection causes high economic and production losses in commercial poultry therefore, this study was conducted to record the prevalence of bacterial infection in commercial poultry farms. Out of 100 samples, nasal (n=50), tracheal (n=50) were collected from selected areas Detha, Moosa Khatian, Tando Hyder and Tando Qaisar, n= 25 from each. From 100 samples n=48 samples were found positive. From total of 48 positive samples, 105 bacterial isolates were found, the overall proportion of bacterial organisms from nasal and tracheal were staphylococcus aureus 15.23%(n=16), Streptococcus spp 20% (n=21), E coli 38.09% (n=40), Salmonella spp 15.23% (n=16), Pseudomonas aeruginosa 9.5% (n=10) and Klebsiella spp 1.90% (n=2). Area wise prevalence of bacterial respiratory infections was recorded in Detha 64% (16/25), Moosa khatian 48% (12/25), Tandohyder 44% (11/25) and Tando Qaisar 36% (9/25). Highest prevalence was recorded in age group of 0-2 weeks 52.08% (25/46), followed by 29.16% (14/29), 18.75% (25/9) in 2-4 week and > 4-week age group respectively. Maximum outbreaks of bacterial respiratory infections were recorded in month of January 50% (30/60) while minimum in March 45% (18/40). Maximum percentage obtained from large scale farming 62.22% (28/45) followed by 36.36% (20/55) in small scale farming respectively. In present investigation it has concluded that overall isolates prevalence of E-coli spp was found maximum. Highest rate of prevalence found in Detha region. 0-2 weeks age group is more effected as compared other age groups. High rate of prevalence for bacterial respiratory infections observed in January as compared to March.


Keywords: Bacterial respiratory infections; Epidemiological studies; Hyderabad; Poultry


http://dx.doi.org/10.19045/bspab.2020.90131

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